Key messages

  • The Department of Health and Human Services has prepared a series of reports about people who use Home and Community Care services.
  • The reports use data from the HACC minimum dataset.
  • The reports build a profile of HACC users based on their cultural and linguistic background, age and gender, and other characteristics. 
  • Nearly 300,000 people received a HACC service in 2012-13.

The Department of Health & Human Services has prepared a series of reports about people using Home and Community Care (HACC) services. The reports use data from the HACC minimum data set, supported by Australian census data.  

The HACC minimum data set incorporates a statistical linkage key (SLK), which allows all records associated with a particular HACC user to be linked without identifying that person. 

Note: Factsheets/graphs are currently on the right hand side of this page for download.

General information about HACC users

The HACC fact sheet 2012-13 provides an overview of HACC users in Victoria, and was derived from the 2012-13 HACC minimum data set.

Number

Nearly 300,000 Victorians received a service from Home and Community Care (HACC) in 2012-13.

Age and sex

74 per cent of clients were aged 65 years and over.

65 per cent of clients were aged 70 years and over.

63 per cent of clients were female.

Ethnicity and indigenous status

25 per cent of clients came from 85 non-English speaking countries.

1 per cent of clients were from Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander background.

Place of residence

About 62 per cent of HACC clients lived in greater Melbourne.

Another 111,200 lived in rural and regional Victoria.

Living arrangement

41 per cent of clients lived alone.

Family carers

33 per cent of clients had a carer, typically a spouse or daughter. In total, over 97,000 people were carers of people using HACC services..

Services used

Allied health was the service type most commonly used, with over 111,400 clients.

Next used were assessment services (over 110,300 clients) and domestic assistance services (over 90,400 clients).

Across all service types, average service provision was just on 43 hours per person per year.

Service mix

51 per cent of clients (151,032 people) received only one type of HACC service.

Over 66,900 clients received two types of service.

About 9,000 clients received six or more service types.

Source of referral

44 per cent of clients (or their families) made direct contact with HACC services —t hat is, self-referral.

General practitioners referred more than 29,900 people to the HACC program.

HACC users by birthplace 2012-13

Use of HACC services by people born in English speaking and non-English speaking countries is derived from the 2012-13 HACC minimum data set. The data is presented by local government area (LGA).

The report excludes a small number of HACC records because the data were incomplete on the SLK, or because the client lived in another state (for example, across the border).

Nearly 300,000 Victorians received a service from Home and Community Care in 2012-13. 

Age groups

The report tables show the total number of HACC clients by two groups: 0‒64 years and 65 years and over.

Birthplace groups

The HACC users in each LGA are divided into two groups according to birthplace:

  • English-speaking countries. The main English-speaking countries are Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United Kingdom, South Africa, Ireland and the United States. Also included are a number of smaller countries in the Caribbean and elsewhere.
  • Non-English speaking countries.

HACC service groups

The 11 HACC service types are divided into three groups:

  • home support services (any mix of domestic assistance, personal care, assessment, case management, property maintenance, delivered meals and respite)
  • nursing and allied health services (nursing, allied health)
  • social support services (planned activity group, volunteer social support).

Client counts

A single uesrs may receive more than one type of service. So, while the tables show an unduplicated count for each of the three service groups, duplication occurs across groups.

HACC users born in non-English speaking countries 2009-10

Use of HACC services by people born in non-English speaking countries presents data on the use of HACC services by older Victorians from non-English speaking backgrounds.

The report is based on the 2006 Census (the count of place of usual residence) and the HACC minimum data set 2009‒10.

The data is presented by region, LGA and statewide. The LGA data cover those LGAs in which people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds aged 70 years or over made up 10 per cent or more of the population, or accounted for 300 or more people.

The report is available to download in four parts:

  • Introduction and regional summary
  • Rural regions
  • Eastern and Southern regions
  • North and west regions.

Birthplace groups

The report divides people aged 70 years or over in each LGA into three groups according to birthplace:

  • English-speaking countries (ESC)
  • the nine non-English speaking countries with the largest populations in that LGA
  • other non-English speaking countries.

The main English speaking countries are Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United Kingdom, South Africa, Ireland and the United States. This group also includes a number of smaller countries in the Caribbean and elsewhere. 

HACC service groupings

The report divides 12 activity types (or service types) of HACC service providers into three main groups:

  • home support (domestic assistance, personal care, assessment, case management, property maintenance, delivered meals, respite)
  • allied health and nursing
  • social support (Planned Activity Groups, volunteer social support).

It describes services in two ways:

  • Total service hours used by people born in a particular country
  • Number of people born in a particular country who received this service.

Things to remember about the data

  • Service quantity was counted as hours per year. Five meals were counted as one hour, to produce comparable data.
  • Counselling was excluded because the data were poor quality.
  • A single client may receive more than one service type. So, the tables do not show an unduplicated count of clients across all service types.

Method used for selecting an LGA’s top 10 countries

  • We calculated the top 10 non-English speaking countries for each LGA.
  • We ranked the top 10 countries in each LGA by their population aged 70 years or over (from the Census), after grouping all English-speaking countries together as ‘ESC’.
  • We used this listing to decide which countries to include in each of the three service groupings.
  • We put the countries that are not in the top 10 into the ‘other non-English speaking countries’ group.

How to read the tables

Suppose, of all the non-English speaking countries, Italy had the largest 70 years or over Census population, with 838 people (ranking 2 after the ESC group). Of these 838 people, 326 were HACC clients aged 70 years or over, and those 326 clients received 8079 hours of home support services. So, the average home support hours per client were 24.8.

You can calculate the coverage (that is, clients as a percentage of the population) by dividing the number of HACC clients aged 70 years or over by the Census population aged 70 years or over: 326 / 838 = 38.9%.