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Immunisation newsletter — October 2017

In this issue:

  • Immunisation — Updated Special risk groups and Adults web pages
  • Two vaccines are routinely given at the 18 month schedule point
  • Free Meningococcal ACWY vaccine for all 15-19 year olds
  • Notify all vaccine doses administered to the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR)
  • National Immunisation Program resources
  • Training a new staff member in the management of vaccine cold chain?
  • Shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) –Are you on target?
  • Further reading.

Immunisation — Updated Special risk groups and Adults web pages

Special, risk groups receive some vaccines for free: vulnerable people, children and adolescents in out-of-home care, medically at-risk people, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and refugees and asylum seekers.

Eligible adults can receive vaccines such as pertussis, influenza, pneumococcal, shingles and hepatitis B under the National Immunisation Program (NIP) and Victorian funded programs.

Make sure your eligible risk groups are being vaccinated with the free vaccines available.

Make sure your eligible adults are being vaccinated with the free vaccines available.


Two vaccines are routinely given at the 18 month schedule point

Children of differnt ages with arrows to correct injection areasA diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTPa) booster was added to the National Immunisation Program for children at 18 months of age in April 2016.

All children born from 1 October 2014 need to have this additional booster dose of DTPa vaccine. This means children receive MMRV and DTPa vaccine at 18 months of age. 

Children overdue their third dose of Infanrix hexa, must have a minimum interval of six months before receiving the DTPa booster dose.

Download and display the poster – Where do I inject vaccines?

Download and display the poster – Confused by MMR containing vaccines?


Free Meningococcal ACWY vaccine for all 15-19 year olds

The time limited Victorian meningococcal ACWY program will finish on 31 December 2017. All young people aged 15-19 years between 18 April 2017 to 31 December 2017 are eligible for funded meningococcal ACWY vaccine.

Free Meningococcal ACWY poster

While most will receive the vaccine at school in Years 10, 11 and 12, remember to offer vaccine to: 

  • 15 year old students in Year 9 (who won’t be offered it at school)
  • eligible people who do not attend school
  • students who missed the vaccine at school.

Share this 1 minute video explaining the program.


Notify all vaccine doses administered to the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR)

The AIR now accepts vaccine records for people of all ages.

You should notify the AIR for doses of:
  • all government funded vaccines administered 
  • all purchased vaccines administered
  • for all ages.

For comprehensive information, see the AIR website.

HPV vaccine doses administered should also be reported to the National HPV Register.


National Immunisation Program expansion resources

Immunise Australia Program logoThe 2017-18 Australian Government Budget announced $14.1 million over four years to provide ongoing access to catch-up vaccines from 1 July 2017 for all individuals aged 10 to 19 years, and refugees and humanitarian entrants.

A suite of communication materials to support awareness and uptake of the new measure have been developed

Order free promotional resources including a poster (IT0228) and consumer flyer (IT0229).

Read the news item.


Training a new staff member in the management of vaccine cold chain?

Do not turn off fridge psoterA range of vaccine cold chain management resources, information and a training webinar are available to help with the education process.

Visit Cold chain management on health.vic.

Visit the Immunisation on health.vic to keep up to date with immunisation information in Victoria.

 


Shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) –Are you on target?

Shoulder pain can be described as a transient side effect of vaccine administration. In some cases, acute onset of shoulder pain and limited range of movement may suggest local injury to structures within the shoulder joint.

Bursitis of the shoulder joint is one of the most common clinically reported diagnosis, usually confirmed by ultrasound. Inflammation of the bursae, called bursitis, can cause localised pain, pain worsened by movement, stiffness and increased pain at night.

This review highlights the importance of educating Immunisation providers on correct vaccine administration and offers some tips on how to avoid a shoulder injury related to vaccine administration.

The Melbourne Vaccine Education Centre has a range of interesting case studies and other educational articles written by SAEFVIC, the Victorian vaccine safety service. Case studies include vaccine preventable diseases and adverse events following immunisation.

Read the Case Series of Bursitis cases reported to SAEFVIC.


Further reading

 

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