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In this issue:

  • Resources promoting measles risk for travellers or people born from 1966
  • Sharing Knowledge about Immunisation - eLearning module for healthcare workers
  • Influenza vaccine – keep vaccinating pregnant women
  • Updated Vaccine and Cold Chain Management webinar
  • Check for expired influenza vaccine brands
  • The pertussis-containing vaccine is provided free to pregnant women

Resources promoting measles risk for travellers or people born from 1966

The Australian Academy of Science developed educational and promotional materials to raise awareness about measles, particularly those most at risk of the disease, such as travellers or those born during or from 1966.

Review the links to the resources, including:

Resources for vaccination providers:

  • Educational video for health professionals to raise awareness of increased notifications and the importance of talking to patients about their vaccination status and the availability of catch-up vaccines.
  • Four articles to support videos.

Ensure at-risk individuals receive the measles-containing vaccine. 

Confused by MMR containing vaccine brands for different age groups? Download the pictorial poster for age recommendations. 

Order the MMR vaccine from the government vaccine order form.


Sharing Knowledge About Immunisation (SKAI) - eLearning module for healthcare workers

This module is designed to help adapt clinical communication skills to meet the needs of all parents, whether they are ready to vaccinate, have questions or intend to decline vaccination altogether. It teaches how to use the SKAI system and teaches strategies to assist immunisation consultations. It will help you recognise parents who can benefit from your time and expertise (and avoid extended or confrontational interactions). It takes about 90 minutes to complete this module. 

SKAI was created by the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance in partnership with The University of Sydney, and with the support of collaborators.

Download fact sheets for answers to parents' common questions and concerns from the SKAI parent website.


Influenza vaccine – keep vaccinating pregnant women

Influenza vaccine is administered in every pregnancy and at any stage of pregnancy. It is never too late to vaccinate since influenza can circulate all year round. Vaccination should be offered while a vaccine is within expiry and available. 

Some 2019 influenza vaccine brands are still available to order and expire at the end of February 2020. 

Pregnant women can then receive the new influenza season vaccine, available about April 2020 prior to the end of the pregnancy.

Vaccination provides protection to both the pregnant woman and the baby in utero and following birth. 

Order the influenza vaccine from the government vaccine order form.


Updated Vaccine and Cold Chain Management webinar

Eastern Melbourne PHN, on behalf of the Victorian and Tasmanian PHN Alliance, have updated the training webinar on Vaccine and Cold Chain Management to reflect the current edition of the National Vaccine Storage guidelines –Strive for 5,third edition. 

The webinar runs for 34 minutes and is relevant for all staff involved with vaccine management from the time it is received by the service until the time the vaccine is administered to the client.

View the Vaccine and Cold Chain Management webinar


Check for expired influenza vaccine brands

Some of the 2019 influenza vaccine brands have already or are soon to expire.

Fluad expired the end of November 2019.

Flu Quadri Junior expires 10 January 2020.

Regularly check, remove and dispose of any expired vaccine from the purpose-built vaccine refrigerator.

Review Table 1. Vaccines and schedules to estimate the monthly stock requirement.


The pertussis-containing vaccine is provided free to pregnant women

Antenatal vaccination is recommended to protect both pregnant women and their babies from pertussis and its complications.

Maternal pertussis antibodies provide protection to babies until they have received at least two doses of pertussis containing vaccines (at six weeks and four months of age).

Babies less than six months of age are at greatest risk of severe disease and death from pertussis.

Pertussis-containing vaccine is recommended as a single dose between 20 and 32 weeks in each pregnancy, including pregnancies that are closely spaced to provide maximal protection to each baby.

Download material vaccination campaign resources for promotion in your service.


Links

Do not overstock vaccines if the health service is closed during the holiday period. It can minimise vaccine wastage if power outages occur due to unexpected events.

Confused by diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis containing vaccine brands for different age groups? Download the pictorial poster for age recommendations.

Measles virus infection diminishes pre-existing antibodies that offer protection from other pathogens. 

Two out of three wild poliovirus strains eradicated

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