health.vic logo Victorian Government Logo

In this issue:

  • 2021 NIP influenza vaccination program advice and resources
  • Immunisation for special risk groups – know what to give
  • Administer pertussis and influenza vaccinations during pregnancy
  • Meningococcal B vaccination – an easy to read resource guide for healthcare providers
  • Cervical cancer elimination progress report 2021 – adolescents need their Gardasil 9 vaccinations
  • Report vaccines to the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR) – it’s now mandatory

2021 NIP influenza vaccination program advice and resources

Review this year’s advice and resources for vaccination providers

Avoid error! Display the reference guide to use the correct influenza vaccine for your patient’s age, and always check the patient’s age before vaccination.


Immunisation for special risk groups – know what to give

Eligible at-risk groups can receive some vaccines for free:

  • vulnerable people, preterm infants, children and adolescents in out-of-home care, medically at-risk people, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, refugees and asylum seekers.

July 2020 introduced new vaccine recommendations for people with risk conditions aged over 12 months including adolescents and adults. Prevenar 13, plus 2 lifetime doses of Pneumovax 23 (at a minimum of 5-year intervals) commenced.

Bexsero, Nimenrix and Act HIB vaccines were funded for specified medical risk conditions.

Report all vaccine doses administered to the Australian Immunisation Register.

Review the ATAGI clinical advice on the vaccine recommendations for people with risk conditions from 1 July 2020.

Download and display - Clinical decision tree for vaccination providers for National Immunisation Program funded (and unfunded) pneumococcal vaccine and for a list of risk conditions.


Administer pertussis and influenza vaccinations during pregnancy

Pertussis and influenza vaccinations during pregnancy are recommended and free. Pertussis vaccination protects babies from pertussis and its complications and influenza vaccination protects both mothers and babies from influenza and its complications for the first few months of life. A recommendation from a healthcare professional plays an important role in improving vaccination uptake.

  • The optimal timing for pertussis vaccination during pregnancy is 20 to 32 weeks gestation (mid 2nd trimester to early 3rd trimester).
  • Influenza vaccine is recommended in every pregnancy and at any stage of pregnancy. Influenza vaccine can safely be given at the same time as pertussis vaccine.
  • Pregnant women who received an influenza vaccine in 2020 should receive a 2021 influenza vaccine before the end of pregnancy.
  • Women who receive influenza vaccine before becoming pregnant should be revaccinated during pregnancy to protect the unborn infant.

Report all vaccine doses administered to the Australian Immunisation Register.

An online communication package can help to conduct effective conversations with expectant parents about vaccinations in pregnancy and for new babies.

Review the NCIRS fact sheet: Vaccinations during pregnancy

COVID-19 vaccination decision guide for women who are pregnant, breast feeding or planning pregnancy


Meningococcal B vaccination – an easy to read resource guide for healthcare providers

Download the new NCIRS resource. It is an easy to understand infographic format explaining who and why a person is eligible for meningococcal B vaccine plus side effects and paracetamol guidance.

Review the recommended vaccine dosing schedules for MenACWY and MenB vaccines for healthy people.

Review the recommended vaccine dosing schedules for MenACWY and MenB vaccines for special risk and immunosuppressed people who have an increased risk of invasive meningococcal disease.


Cervical cancer elimination progress report 2021 – adolescents need their Gardasil 9 vaccinations

The National Health and Medical Research Council has published the 2021 CERVICAL CANCER ELIMINATION PROGRESS REPORT: Australia’s progress towards the elimination of cervical cancer as a public health problem.

The report finds that modelling has suggested, for countries that have introduced both-sex vaccination (such as Australia), that elimination of vaccine-preventable HPV types is likely achievable with a sustained coverage of 80%.

Nationally, in the cohort who turned 15 in 2019, HPV vaccination coverage with completed two-dose courses was 78.2%, while Victoria achieved 81.4% coverage for girls; 78.5% coverage for boys.

Be sure you are providing all the age appropriate adolescent vaccines – Boostrix, Gardasil 9 and Nimenrix according to the National Immunisation Program by downloading the Victorian immunisation schedule.


Report vaccines to the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR) – it’s now mandatory

Mandatory reporting to the AIR commenced from:

  • 19 February 2021 for COVID-19 vaccinations
  • 1 March 2021 for influenza vaccinations
  • 1 July 2021 for all National Immunisation Program vaccinations.

If it is practicable to do so, report within 24 hours after a vaccination is administered; or otherwise within 10 business days.

The AIR provides an Immunisation History Statement (IHS) which displays immunisations that an individual has had recorded on the AIR. The IHS can be viewed and printed via Medicare Online, myGov or the Express Plus Medicare mobile app. Vaccination providers can print an IHS on behalf of their patients. Immunisation information on My Health Record is updated via a daily feed from AIR data.

The IHS can be used to prove immunisation status for childcare, school, employment or travel purposes.

Information for vaccination providers about how to set up access to the AIR.


Links

Find out more about vaccination for children, adolescents and adults, including the schedule, vaccine eligibility, reporting adverse events, ordering vaccines, managing the cold chain and accessing resources.

Influenza Vaccine Study in adults aged over 50 years. Professor Terry Nolan of the Vaccine and Research Immunisation Group at the Doherty Institute, University of Melbourne is inviting healthy adults aged 50 years and over to take part in a clinical research study looking at the immune response of an experimental flu vaccine compared to a routinely used flu vaccine. The experimental vaccine contains different dosages of adjuvant. The use of adjuvants may boost the immune response to flu vaccine in older adults. Participation will last for about 6 months and will include 3 visits to the clinic and 2 telephone calls to check your health. Reimbursement will be provided for travel and for your time. To find out more contact the Vaccine and Immunisation Research Group at virgo-studies@unimelb.edu.au or call 8344 9325.

Subscribe to stay up to date with the latest clinical and program guidance on the National Immunisation Program to help you deliver immunisation services to your patients.

Twitter

Follow us on Twitter  @vicgovdhhs

Get the latest health news and updates

Connect with us

Twitter Facebook YouTube RSS
© Copyright State of Victoria