Family Safety Victoria

Family Safety Victoria is a new agency dedicated to delivering family violence reform across the state. The new agency will begin operating on 1 July 2017.

Family Safety Victoria will lead the implementation of new initiatives to tackle family violence, including establishing a central information point that will allow police, courts and government services to track perpetrators and keep victims safe.

The agency was created in response to the recommendations of Australia’s Royal Commission into Family Violence. The Family violence rolling action plan details the steps for implementing all of the recommendations.

The rolling action plan also includes the prevention strategy Free from violence: Victoria’s strategy to prevent family violence and all forms of violence against women. A new dedicated prevention agency will use this strategy to drive long-term family violence prevention. 

Find out more about the rolling action plan and strategy

Family Violence Prevention Agency

A dedicated prevention agency is being established to support implementation and coordination of our primary prevention strategy Free from violence: Victoria’s strategy to prevent family violence and all forms of violence against women. The prevention agency will coordinate and support local prevention partnerships and alliances, advise on behavioural change campaigns, and work with other organisations operating in the field of family violence prevention.

The new agency will ensure that future investments are evidence based and target programs that are proven to be effective.

The agency will also support gender equality in line with the Safe and strong: a Victorian gender equality plan

Family violence workforce census

The census closed on Friday, 19 May 2017.

The Royal Commission into Family Violence highlighted one of the challenges to effective industry planning was a lack of workforce data. The Family Violence Workforce Census will help address this gap by capturing critical data about capabilities and skills of the workforce, workforce supply, remuneration and conditions and health and wellbeing.

Data has been collected across a range of workforces that have a role in preventing, identifying and responding to family violence - from specialist family violence services and those undertaking primary prevention activities through to mainstream and universal services, such as GPs, maternal and child health nurses and teachers.

The information gathered for the census will be instrumental in highlighting key workforce issues for the Victorian Government’s 10-year industry plan that will be delivered in December 2017. 

Find out more about the census.

Review of Victoria's family violence risk assessment framework

The Department of Health and Human Services appointed Monash University to conduct a review of the Family violence common risk assessment framework (CRAF) as part of its response to the Victorian Royal Commission into Family Violence. The final report of the review was released in September 2016. 

Overall, the review found that the CRAF has worked effectively to build shared understanding of, and responsibility for, risk assessment of intimate partner violence as the most prevalent form of family violence. While acknowledging its limitations, those who consistently use the framework testify to its utility in working with women on identifying and understanding their own risk and supporting the professional judgement of support workers in a range of professional contexts.

The review makes 27 recommendations aimed at enhancing the use and usability of the CRAF and more effectively embedding it across different professional groups.

For more information visit the Monash University website

About the 10-year family violence plan

Ending family violence: Victoria’s plan for change details how the Victorian Government will deliver the 227 recommendations made by the Royal Commission into Family Violence and build a new system that supports families and strengthens victims' protection from perpetrators.

Subsequently, the Family violence rolling action plan was released, announcing that from 1 July 2017, Family Safety Victoria is the new dedicated agency for delivering family violence reform across the state. 

Under the plan, the government will:

  • establish 17 support and safety hubs across the state, where victim survivors can access the support they need to stay safe
  • provide after-hours crisis support, counselling and therapy for tens of thousands of women and their children
  • implement five specialist family violence courts across the state and make the system more responsive to victims’ needs
  • provide extra long-term housing, more rental assistance, improved crisis accommodation and better support for people fleeing family violence.

The rolling action plan includes the prevention strategy Free from violence: Victoria’s strategy to prevent family violence and all forms of violence against women. The new dedicated prevention agency will use this strategy to drive long-term family violence prevention. 

As well, the Victorian Centre for Data Insights will change the way that government collects information and will build new capabilities to analyse data to protect families at risk.

Find out more about Family Safety Victoria, the rolling action plan and the strategy.

Royal Commission into Family Violence

The Royal Commission into Family Violence provided a once in a generation opportunity to examine the system from the ground up and put victim survivors at the centre of family violence reform. It investigated criminal law corrections and the courts, support services, the health system and alcohol and drug treatment. It also looked at refuges, housing and education, and the resources and tools available to police officers.

The Royal Commission has provided practical recommendations to prevent and address family violence, based on an examination of the current service system and best practice approaches. The Victorian Government has committed to implementing each of the Family Violence Royal Commission Report recommendations.

Royal Commission into Family Violence: Full report (2,082 pages, 23 MB)

Royal Commission into Family Violence: Summary and recommendations (116 pages, 3.9 MB)