Key messages

  • Funded alcohol and other drug treatment services in Victoria must comply with the requirements of any relevant accreditations and standards. They must be, or able to be, accredited within generic accreditation frameworks by a certified entity.
  • Funded organisations also must adhere to any quality framework or policy adopted by the Victorian Department of Health & Human Services.
  • To ensure that funded organisations provide safe and high-quality alcohol and other drug treatment services, they are expected to take into account core quality principles in strategies and approaches to service delivery.
  • Service providers must agree to the department’s procedures for incident reporting as a condition of funding.
  • Under the new Health Complaints Act 2016, the Health Complaints Commissioner has powers to investigate complaints made against alcohol and other drug service providers in Victoria. 

Standards and accreditation requirements

Alcohol and other drug treatment services must provide consistently high-quality and safe services, and comply with relevant accreditations and standards. The policy and funding guidelines require organisations that receive funding for the delivery of alcohol and other drug treatment services to adhere to any quality framework or policy initiative adopted by the Department of Health & Human Services.

It is compulsory for funded providers to comply with the department's requirements regarding accreditation. This involves service providers funded to deliver alcohol and other drug treatment services to be, or able to be, accredited within existing generic accreditation frameworks by an entity that is certified by the International Society for Quality Health Care or the Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand.

Providers are required to establish and implement plans to deliver services consistent with the Victorian alcohol and other drug client charter.

For more information, please see the Accreditation requirements factsheet in Downloads.

Safety and quality

The department recognises that safety and quality are critical to the successful delivery of alcohol and other drug treatment. The department expects alcohol and other drug treatment services to take into account the following core quality principles when considering strategies and approaches for the delivery of a safe, quality service. These principles underpin the Australian safety and quality framework for health care and are as follows:

  • principle 1- person-centred
  • principle 2 - driven by information
  • principle 3 - organised for safety and quality.

Incident reporting

Service providers are required to agree to the department's procedures for incident reporting as a condition of funding. Information on these requirements for NGO-funded service providers can be found at incident reporting. For public health services, arrangements will be made for reporting that fits within existing systems for those services.

Complaints

In April 2016, the Parliament passed the Health Complaints Act 2016 (the Act).

Under the legislation, the new Health Complaints Commissioner has powers to take action against registered and unregistered health practitioners, including public and private alcohol and other drug service providers and individual practitioners. Anyone can make a complaint, and the Commissioner has powers investigate matters that could have been the subject of a complaint even when no complaint is lodged.

For more information, please see the Act factsheet in Downloads.